THE BEACH BALL - Two Day Pass

A Rum & Humble/Spaceland Concert - Saturday, September 21 & Sunday, September 22, 2013

THE BEACH BALL - Two Day Pass

Sat, September 21, 2013 - Sun, September 22, 2013

Doors: 3:00 pm / Show: 4:00 pm

Santa Monica Pier

Santa Monica, CA

This event is all ages


*SHOW IS RAIN OR SHINE
**Lineup subject to change
***Certain sections 21+ only
Retain ticket for entry on both 9/21 and 9/22

THE BEACH BALL -Two Day Pass
THE BEACH BALL -Two Day Pass
Music just sounds better when it's being played outdoors by the ocean. There's something inherently romantic about all that water brimming against the shore and the voices of seagulls and humans mingling in the salty air as the sun sails stubbornly over the horizon. While the Santa Monica Pier hosts free, weekly concerts every summer, co-promoters Rum & Humble and Spaceland Productions are adding something different this year, marking the change of seasons with two disparate, jam-packed (and not free) music festivals. In two weeks, the autumnal plaints of folkies and alt-cowboys will ring out at the Way Over Yonder fest, but today summer gets a last soulful goodbye at the Beach Ball, which features the uplifting and increasingly rueful meditations of Aloe Blacc, funk-jazz maestro Maceo Parker (who's blown sax for James Brown, P-Funk and Prince), revitalized soul veteran Lee Fields, breezy soul-pop duo Myron & E and relatively lightweight nu-soul revivalist Allen Stone. The Beach Ball bounces onward with an all-reggae lineup on Sunday, Sept. 22. - LA Times
Aloe Blacc
Aloe Blacc
"My purpose for music is positive social change," says Orange County, California native Aloe Blacc. "Even if the music itself does not explicitly express anything that may signify positive social change, the product of the music will." He is speaking in general terms regarding his career, but more specifically about the circumstances surrounding his upcoming album, Good Things, co-written by the versatile vocalist and songwriter in conjunction with the in-house production team at Truth & Soul Records.
Good Things marks a shift in methodology from personal to political for Aloe, who refers to the project as his report on present conditions—joblessness, homeless, the misappropriation of wealth, pillaging of resources, and a universal lack of compassion from the capitalism at-large under which we all function, but some struggle to survive. Song titles such as "You Make Me Smile" and "Miss Fortune," coupled with airy, ethereal production from Truth & Soul's Leon Michels and Jeff Silverman mask a foreboding undercurrent in which Aloe crafts lyrics both thoughtful and thought-provoking. Nowhere is this more evident than on lead single, "I Need a Dollar"—commissioned by HBO as the theme music for the series How to Make It in America—because ultimately, that is how to make it in America.
The first-generation American offspring of Panamanian parents, Aloe has become what writer and activist Amiri Baraka (nee Leroi Jones) once said of John Coltrane. He is a singular "scope of feeling…a more fixed traveler" who has found cohesion in art and life. The path from his 2006 debut, the multi-genre Shine Through, to Good Things is akin to the maturation of Marvin Gaye between That's the Way Love Is and the What's Going On masterwork that followed. Aloe has never purported to be any heir to Gaye, but musically, Good Things and What's Going On are companion pieces as both albums establish a character for the artists that sets them apart from the sea of performers making very vivid and discernible—yet normative and conformist—statements about who they are and what they do. Good Things is a definitive declaration that places Aloe directly in the framework of modern soul.
At the heart of this musical character is a recession-age Robin Hood, whose goal is to sell and profit from his wares with hope of freeing the less fortunate from the capitalist system that serves as both their oppressor and his motivation. A 2001 graduate of the University of Southern California, Aloe credits a myriad of influences—transcendentalist scholars Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson, French existentialism, Oprah Winfrey, Tavis Smiley, Cornel West—with leading him from the inner streams of consciousness he possessed as an MC early in his career, to a more disciplined approach to songwriting, and now, the desire to affect change and induce compassion by way of his own success. It is his grand scheme, which, not coincidentally, is also the name of his backing band (The Grand Scheme). The key is compromise and understanding the power of popular art. Aloe is willing to put the gloves on and engage in the marketplace. Good things lie ahead. – Ronnie Reese
Allen Stone
Allen Stone
ALLEN STONE USA Today has called Allen Stone a "pitch-perfect powerhouse"
and The New York Times has likened his socially conscious music to that of Stevie Wonder,
Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway and Bill Withers. But the 25-year-old singer-songwriter from
the tiny backwoods town of Chewelah, Washington just sees himself as "a hippie with soul."

One look at his long, curly blond hair and thick-rimmed glasses brings home the first part of that equation – and perhaps leaves one unprepared for the raw, soulful power unleashed when Stone
opens his mouth to sing.

Like many soul singers, Stone got his start in church. He was a preacher's kid, so whipping crowds into a call-and-response frenzy as he performs "Say So" is second nature. Steeped in gospel music and shielded from secular songs, Allen didn't discover soul music until he was a teenager and started collecting classic albums from the 60's and 70's.

"Soul music from that time wasn't just about bumpin' and grindin' at the club – it was a huge part of a cultural movement. That's where my inspiration comes from," says Stone, who was also schooled by folk records of the period.

On his new album, Stone shines a light into some of the darker corners of his own era. "Contact High" is a striking commentary on the toll technology has taken on relationships and the sensuous sounding "Unaware" is a sly examination of the current economic crisis. This is the kind of stuff that keeps Stone up at night and keeps him on the road, as he sings in the single "Sleep": "Spend my night shootin' at the stars/Trying to change the world with this guitar/I know it's a long shot/But it's working out so far…"

While he is in awe of music's power to ignite change, Stone is equally enraptured by its ability to simply make people feel good – as evidenced by songs like "Celebrate Tonight" and "Say So" and the dance-offs that are de rigueur at his shows.

Stone has spent the past four years honing his unique style the old-fashioned way: crisscrossing the country in a van with his ace band and playing any small club that would have him. Since the digital release of his self-titled album via his own stickystones label in October 2011, Stone's shows have been selling out from coast to coast. The album jumped into the Top 10 of Billboard's Heatseekers chart and entered the Top 5 of iTunes' R&B/Soul charts. His first national television appearance – on "Conan" – came after the music booker saw a YouTube video of Allen performing "Unaware" in his mother's living room. Performances on "Jimmy Kimmel Live," "Last Call with Carson Daly" and "Live from Daryl's House" followed and Esquire, CNN and Billboard named Stone as an artist to watch – all before he had the support of a record label. Stone has since signed to ATO Records, which is bringing the album into wide release.
Maceo Parker
Maceo Parker
Maceo Parker: his name is synonymous with Funky Music, his pedigree impeccable; his band: the tightest little funk orchestra on earth.

Everyone knows by now that he's played with each and every leader of funk, his start with James Brown, which Maceo describes as " like being at University "; jumping aboard the Mothership with George Clinton; stretching out with Bootsy's Rubber Band. He's the living, breathing pulse that connects the history of Funk in one golden thread. The cipher that unravels dance music down to its core.

"Everything's coming up Maceo," concluded DownBeat Magazine in a 1991 article at the beginning of Maceo Parker's solo career. At the time Maceo was remembered by aficionados of funk music as sideman; appreciated mainly by those in the know. More than a decade and a half later Maceo Parker has been enjoying a blistering solo career. For the past sixteen years Maceo has been building a new funk empire, fresh and stylistically diverse. He navigates deftly between James Brown's 1960's soul and George Clinton's 1970's freaky funk while exploring mellower jazz and the grooves of hip-hop.

His collaborations over the years performing or recording or both have included Ray Charles, Ani Difranco, James Taylor, De La Soul, Dave Matthews Band and the Red Hot Chilli Peppers. His timeless sound has garnered him a fresh young fan base.
Michael Rose (Black Uhuru)
Michael Rose (Black Uhuru)
For over 25 years, Michael Rose has been recording and performing his brand of militant, hardcore Jamaican music to the delight of reggae fans around the world. As a solo artist, with Black Uhuru, and back as a solo artist, the "Ruff" Rose has achieved great success throughout his career, even as different Jamaican musical styles have phased in and out of popularity.

michael rose Perhaps the highest profile recognition came in 1984, when Michael Rose and the other Black Uhuru members (Duckie Simpson, Puma Jones, Sly Dunbar, and Robbie Shakespeare) won reggae's first Grammy award for the album, Anthem. But the story doesn't begin with Black Uhuru. In 1976, Michael Rose was already a seasoned performer, having honed his skills by performing on Jamaica's hotel circuit. When an early incarnation of Black Uhuru (Ducky Simpson and Errol Nelson) approached Michael to join the group, he already had several solo singles to his credit. These include the original "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" and "Clap the Barber," both recorded for producer Niney The Observer, and "Running Around" for Winston Campbell.

black uruhu Black Uhuru's first full length was released in 1977 and called Love Crisis. It was produced by King Jammy (then Prince Jammy), and the big hit of the album was "I Love King Selassie." But it was not until the Showcase album was released in 1980-with a new lineup of Michael Rose, Duckie Simpson, and Puma Jones-that Black Uhuru reached their creative peak. Heartbeat reissued the set on CD (Guess Who's Coming To Dinner, HB 18), which includes the massive 12" singles "Shine Eye Gal," "General Penitentiary," "Plastic Smile," and of course, "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner." At the forefront of the recordings and live shows was the charismatic Michael Rose, who had incredible stage presence and a vocal style all his own. So popular was his trademark sound that singers like Don Carlos, Junior Reid, Yami Bolo, and others embraced it as the "Waterhouse" sound.

Throughout the first half of the 1980s, Black Uhuru continued their success with albums on Island Records-Sinsemilla, Red, Chill Out, and Anthem, along with compilations, dub albums, and live albums. They became the best-known reggae act since Bob Marley, and won the first reggae Grammy for Anthem in 1984. Even today, Island continues to capitalize on the group's success by re-compiling and re-releasing the group's Island years material.

mykal rose
With lead singer Michael Rose seemingly at the top of his game, he parted ways with Black Uhuru, with the intention of redefining his musical direction as a solo artist. In the early 1990s, Michael Rose suddenly appeared on the scene with new material including Jamaican singles produced by Sly & Robbie ("Monkey Business," "Visit Them," "One a We Two a We"), and three albums (Proud, Bonanza, and King of General) released in Japan.

As a solo artist, Michael regularly tours the U.S. and Europe, and has maintained his Jamaican fan base with hit singles on the island and abroad. He is a modern roots singer, and fits perfectly into today's scene. With a glorious past and a wide-open future, Michael Rose is truly a reggae superstar.
Sly & Robbie
Sly & Robbie
The legendary Sly and Robbie and The Taxi Gang are touring North America again in September / October 2011. Their group consists of top cream of the crop studio musicians who produced many of the great hit reggae rhythm tracks over the years. On stage, the taxi Gang is big and bold, working the stage with ease and exceptional talent. They toured Europe in the summer of 2010 and they are slated to tour Europe again in July/ August 2011. In June 2010 they were top artists on Reggae in the Desert, in Las Vegas and in August 2010 they headlined the Monterey Bay Reggaefest. They performed on the Raggamuffins, Bob Marley Day Festival arena shows in Long Beach and San Diego CA in February, and they also headlined the Sierra Nevada World Music Festival and the Earthdance festival in Northern CA.

In the summer of 2008 they toured all over North America doing stadium shows opening for Slightly Stupid. The summer of 2007, Sly and Robbie and the Taxi Gang and Cherine Anderson had a very successful western US and western and eastern Canada tour. August 5th they were top billing on the 2007 Reggae Rising (formerly Reggae on the River), and August 12th they played the Hollywood Bowl KCRW World Festival. Since then they have performed on the Hollywood Bowl festival every year.

Sly and Robbie, affectionately known as the Riddim Twins, are perhaps the premiere architects of the modern sound of Jamaican music. Building on the cornerstones of Studio 1 and other early pioneers of the Jamaican recording industry, Sly and Robbie became the driving force behind the fabled Channel 1 sound that dominated reggae throughout the late 70's and early 80's. Subsequent work, most notably with Peter Tosh and Black Uhuru, set the pace for the changing sound of reggae in the post-Bob Marley era. Their stellar playing and production work have also graced albums for a host of international artists including, among many, Bob Dylan, Britney Spears, Alicia Keys, UB40’s Ali Campbell, Grace Jones, Joe Cocker, No Doubt, the Fugees, Michael Franti, Sinead O'Connor, The Rolling Stones, and countless others. For more information on Sly and Robbie, their website is www.officialslyandrobbie.com

The legendary Sly and Robbie and The Taxi Gang and the ‘Princess of Dancehall Soul’, Cherine Anderson, are available on tour August 2008. They are touring with Slightly Stoopid and Pepper, and are also doing shows on their own. This is a conscious, roots-oriented tour package featuring the cream of the crop foundation musicians of the reggae genre. Queen Ifrica, Cherine Anderson and The Taxi Gang were recently billed on the Raggamuffin, Bob Marley Day Festival arena shows in Long Beach and San Diego CA, where they were a highlight on the shows. Last summer, Sly and Robbie and the Taxi Gang and Cherine Anderson had a very successful western US and western and eastern Canada tour. August 5th they were top billing on the 2007 Reggae Rising (formerly Reggae on the River), and August 12th they played the Hollywood Bowl KCRW World Festival.

Sly and Robbie, affectionately known as the Riddim Twins, are perhaps the premiere architects of the modern sound of Jamaican music. Building on the cornerstones of Studio 1 and other early pioneers of the Jamaican recording industry, Sly and Robbie became the driving force behind the fabled Channel 1 sound that dominated reggae throughout the late 70's and early 80's. Subsequent work, most notably with Peter Tosh and Black Uhuru, set the pace for the changing sound of reggae in the post-Bob Marley era. Their stellar playing and production work have also graced albums for a host of international artists including, among many, Bob Dylan, Britney Spears, Alicia Keys, UB40’s Ali Campbell, Grace Jones, Joe Cocker, No Doubt, the Fugees, Michael Franti, Sinead O'Connor, The Rolling Stones, and countless others. For more information on Sly and Robbie, their website is www.officialslyandrobbie.com

Cherine Anderson was featured on last summer’s North America, Canada Sly and Robbie and The Taxi Gang tour. She is currently a fast rising singer, songwriter and actress, who starred in two of Jamaica’s most successful films – Dancehall Queen (1997) and One Love (2003). Lately she has been focusing on building her music catalogue and perfecting her sound, writing and collaborating with industry giants such as Sly and Robbie, David Norland (Madonna, Janet Jackson and Dallas Austin), Jeeky Man (Lil Kim), Lenky (Sean Paul), and Christopher Birch (Shaggy). This new star has seen great fan and chart response to her first three singles - “Good Love”, “Coming Over Tonight” and “Kingston State of Mind” - with “Coming Over Tonight” holding the number one spot on the Jamaican charts for several weeks. Cherine possesses talent, beauty and class. She too represents the conscious side of the music, expressing the female perspective in reggae and dancehall music. For more information, read her bio and check her my space at www.myspace.com/cherineanderson. She performed on Reggae on the River and Reggae Rising the last two years in a row and is currently in demand in Japan and worldwide.
The Skatalites
The Skatalites
The Skatalites began performing in Jamaica in May 1964. The group was so hot that their first rehearsal became a show. So many people had lined up outside the venue, they decided to just charge admission and let everybody in! They were the top musicians on the island at the time, having come together after playing in different bands and on various recording sessions. These records were made to be played at the many competing sound systems around the island. The band became legendary, backing all the developing artists of the day, such as Toots and The Maytals, Prince Buster and "The Wailing Wailers" featuring Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. These groups were all recording on the new beat called ska, which had an infectious rhythm that was catching on like wildfire. Eventually, the beat slowed down into rocksteady, and then reggae. This wildfire spread unstoppably around the world, developing into a huge musical tree with many stylistic branches, including lovers rock, dub, dancehall/ ragga, ska-punk,, and others. Hugely popular groups, like The Police, The Clash, The Specials, The English Beat, Sublime and No Doubt, all have their roots firmly planted in the music of The Skatalites.

Since reforming after an almost 20 year hiatus in 1983, and beginning regular touring as a unit in 1989, they have not stopped thrilling audiences in every corner of the globe. Even after 48 years, and various lineup changes as members leave one stage for another, the band continues to perform and record new music in the inimitable Jamaican style, like only they can. The road has been long and hard, and sadly, seen most of the original members pass on. Often asked "when will you stop?" and "how do you keep doing it after all these years?", the answer is simple: never - It's the love of the music and the way our fans respond that keep us going Forward!

Featuring original alto sax man Lester "Ska" Sterling and vocalist Doreen Shaffer, along with the current lineup of outstanding musicians they have chosen to accompany them, the band proudly presents live the music of Jamaican Ska.

Forever indebted to the inspiration and talent of Roland Alphonso, Lloyd Brevett, Don Drummond, Jerome "jah jerry" Haynes, Lloyd Knibb, Tommy McCook, Donat "Jackie" Mittoo, John "Dizzy Johnny"Moore, and Lester Sterling, collectively known as The Skatalites.
Lee Fields & The Expressions
Lee Fields & The Expressions
After his rediscovery in the mid 90s, his faithful have featured him on a slew on singles, a full-length on Desco Records entitled "Let's Get It On', a full-length on Soul Fire entitled "Problems", and on Sharon Jones's critically acclaimed album, "Naturally". Most recently, he has featured on a number of tracks by French house producer, Martin Solveig. Suprisingly, many of of those songs have become top ten hits for Solveig and have turned Lee Fields into a bonafide celebrity in France and other parts of Europe. Yet, outside of a rabid cult following, his story remained untold in America.

When Truth & Soul rose from Soul Fire's ashes in 2004, the first mission of label owners/producers Jeff Silverman and Leon Michels, was to record a sweet soul record that would be modeled after the near perfect formula that bands like The Moments, The Delfonics, and The Stylistics had created. But with a decidedly modern bent. The two producer/songwriters were perfect for the job, having dedicated their talents to the likes of Adele, Iggy Pop, Amy Winehouse alongside Just Blaze, Ghostface Killah and Jay Z

Turning their attention to Lee Fields, the duo wanted an album full of music that was both tough as nails and sweet as honey. They wanted ballads laced with lush strings and smooth vocal harmonies layered over a hard-hitting rhythm section. Michels and Silverman enlisted the service of a the group of New York studio musicians that have provided the back drop for records by The Dap Kings, Amy Winehouse, Bronx River Parkway, El Michels Affair and TV on The Radio. Those musicians include Leon Michels, Homer Steinweiss, Quincy Bright, Nick Movshon, Thomas Brenneck, Toby Pazner, Aaron Johnson, Dave Guy, Michael Leonhart, and members of legendary doo-wop group, The Del-Larks.

Four years later and Lee Fields & The Expressions have successfully created a unique and personal sound that can hold court with the bands they set out to emulate. However, what they've created in the process goes beyond just a carbon copy of a sweet soul music from the 60's and early 70's. The formula has remained the same but the style has been adapted for the ears of youngsters whose experiences with soul began with Amy, not Al, Otis and Marvin. Thirty years of retrospection has colored this cross-generational melding of the minds. It sounds odd on paper, but the results are classic: hip hop-reared record collectors come full circle to produce an album of beautiful soul music with one of the progenitors who made it all possible.
Myron & E
Myron & E
The vocal duo is something of a rarity. There have been countless solo stars, trios, quartets and quintets, but the pairing of equally talented singers isn't nearly as common. Sam and Dave, Ashford and Simpson, the Righteous Brothers and the Everly Brothers comprise a short list of standouts. Enter Myron & E.

Myron (Myron Glasper) was born and raised in South Central Los Angeles. He sang in choirs and played piano growing up, and was a star athlete in football and track, but found his calling as a dancer. Working with Rosie Perez landed him on the early '90s sketch comedy show In Living Color. During those years, however, the streets of South Central were no place to foster creativity, so Myron moved to the Bay and began touring as a backup singer, which is where he met E (Eric "E da Boss" Cooke).

E, a native of Newark, New Jersey, got his first taste of music by playing records during family card games and fish frys. As a teen, he began collecting records of his own and DJing, hanging at the Music Factory and Rock and Soul in New York City. After relocating to southwest Virginia, he graduated high school and began DJing parties, which allowed him to invest in an Ensoniq ASR-10 keyboard, two Technics turntables and an eight-track recorder.

The two began working together while on the road with the Bay Area's Blackalicious, and shortly after, E released an independent record as E da Boss. While touring in Finland behind his solo project, E found himself in an impromptu jam session with members of The Soul Investigators, whose work with singer Nicole Willis helped define them as one of Europe's foremost retro-soul bands.

Investigators producer Didier Selin was impressed enough to leave E with several unfinished tracks. Back in the U.S., E recruited Myron as a singing and songwriting partner, and Myron & E was born.

Myron & E and the Soul Investigators released a string of excellent funk 45s on the Timmion label—starting with 2008's "Cold Game"/"I Can't Let You Get Away"—before signing with Stones Throw last year. Since then, Myron & E have been focused on building their live performance, which includes sold-out shows before even having a full-length release and a stellar showing at SXSW. "We showed up to show out and that's what we did," E says of their SXSW appearance.

Myron & E are proud to be releasing their debut album, Broadway, this summer. For the album, the Soul Investigators provided demos from overseas with the duo stationed on the west coast writing the lyrics and singing all the vocals. E, in particular, has a practice of sending YouTube links of classic soul and R&B songs to the band to provide inspiration for recreating that vibe. One such link was to Edwin Starr's "Running Back and Forth." The Soul Investigators responded with "Everyday Love."

"I don't really think there's anybody else that can do it as good as they can," E says about the band. "They do it like none other."
U Roy
U Roy
U-Roy's musical career began in 1961 when he began deejaying at various sound systems, including a stint operating Sir Coxsone Dodd's Number Two set, while King Stitt "The Ugly One" ran the main set, eventually working in the late 1960s with King Tubby, at Duke Reid's Sound System. Tubby was then experimenting with his equipment, in the process of inventing dub music. With U-Roy as his most prominent deejay, and with access to some of the Treasure Isle Studios' finest rocksteady rhythms, King Tubby's new sound became extraordinarily popular and U-Roy became a Jamaican celebrity. However, his first single was "Earth's Rightful Ruler", recorded with Peter Tosh for Lee Perry. He recorded Dynamic Fashion Way, his first successful recording, in 1969 for Keith Hudson and then worked with almost every producer on the island: Lee Perry, Peter Tosh, Bunny Lee, Phil Pratt, Sonia Pottinger, Rupie Edwards, Alvin Ranglin and Lloyd Daley.

In 1970, Jamaican singer John Holt became enamoured of U-Roy's technique. Working with Duke Reid, U-Roy's fame grew through a series of singles, including "Wake the Town" and "Wear You to the Ball".

U-Roy's success continued throughout the 1970s, perhaps most famously with the album Dread in a Babylon, produced by "prince Tony Robinson, and its iconic picture of him disappearing in a thick cloud of cannabis smoke while holding a chalice. Indeed, there was also a song called "Chalice in the Palace", in which he fantasised about smoking with Queen Elizabeth II in Buckingham Palace. U-Roy had become one of the island's biggest stars by the early 1980s, also garnering significant acclaim in the United Kingdom.

His most recent album was 2000's Serious Matter [1].

U Roy was awarded the Order of Distinction in the rank of Officer on October 15, 2007.[1]

Was frequently played on Joe Strummer's London Calling BBC World Service radio show
Funky Sole DJs
Funky Sole DJs
Funky Sole Djs Music Man Miles, Clifton, Chico & Mean Mr. Mustard
Dub Club DJs
Dub Club DJs
Spinning the best in classic reggae, dub, and dancehall. Regular DJs - Tom Chasteen, Boss Harmony, Dungeonmaster, Roy Corduroy.MCs: Jah Faith, Chicho Don & Benjamin.
Venue Information:
Santa Monica Pier
Ocean Ave. at Colorado Ave.
Santa Monica, CA, 90401