Justice for Joseph - A benefit show for acclaimed author Joseph Mattson

The Echo Presents

Justice for Joseph - A benefit show for acclaimed author Joseph Mattson

Jail Weddings, The Starvations, Detective, L.A. Drugz

Tue, December 4, 2012

8:00 pm

The Echo

Los Angeles, California

$12.00 - $15.00

This event is 18 and over

Justice for Joseph - a benefit show for acclaimed author Joseph Mattson for emergency legal funds more info: https://www.wepay.com/donations/help-support-joseph-mattson THE STARVATIONS (reunion) DETECTIVE (James Greer of Guided By Voices, Author of The Failure) L.A. DRUGS (Justin Maurer of Clorox Girls, author of 17 Television/Don't Take Your Life) plus more!

Justice for Joseph - A benefit show for acclaimed author Joseph Mattson
Justice for Joseph - A benefit show for acclaimed author Joseph Mattson
Author and key LA literary figure Joseph Mattson and his family--(his fiancee and 8-week-old infant son)--are in serious jeopardy and need emergency aid. Mattson is the author of the acclaimed novel Empty the Sun, the story collection Eat Hell, and is editor of The Speed Chronicles, as well as a regular contributor to Slake and The Rattling Wall and much more. Last year, Joseph's mother was the victim of homicide, killed by her husband in a brutal act of domestic assault so severe that perfect outlines of the killer's fists were imprinted in bruise all over her body; she died of brain death resulting from a brain bleed, the fatal wound caused by traumatic head impact. The man is currently in prison, serving out a sentence of 2-9 years for manslaughter and will likely be released in December, 2013, after only the mandatory 2 years--due to the poor economy. In the wake of his mother's death, Mattson was named personal representative of her affairs, including her estate, which is comprised predominantly of property and investments inherited by Joseph's mother from her parents/Joseph's grandparents. Earlier this year, her killer/husband filed litigation to try to take possession of his victim's estate. While "slayer rules" exist to prohibit such unconscionable acts by revoking a killer's rights of inheritance so that he cannot benefit from the person he killed, it has been recently discovered that Mattson's probate lawyers failed across the board not only to apply these "slayer rules" but also failed to protect Mattson's rights as a registered crime victim, rights to object to and appeal the killer's petitions, and allowing the killer carte blanch access to Mattson's personal information--directly compromising and endangering Mattson's, his fiancee's, and their newborn son's safety and security--including violating Mattson's freedom to write--and so much more, resulting in total immediate financial loss for Mattson due to over $50,000 in legal fees and protections, with another mountain of debt coming in order to secure new representation and to launch counter litigation to protect him and his family from the felon that took his mother's life. Mattson is in dire need of money for legal aid, family welfare and infant healthcare, household security, and basic living expenses while unable to work in order to attend to this dire crisis situation. We need to raise an immediate $25,000 for urgent legal aid and security, and another $25,000 in the long-run (in the next few months) to cover everything else mentioned above. Full details are available by inquiry.
TESTIMONIALS

“Joseph Mattson writes like a guitar player with nineteen fingers—everywhere at once, stinging, dark, and beautiful.” —JERRY STAHL, author of PERMANENT MIDNIGHT and PAIN KILLERS

“Joseph is a keystone species in our fragile literary ecosystem. His presence in LA letters helps us all thrive.” —Joe Donnelly, publisher and co-editor, Slake:Los Angeles
“Joseph Mattson is an echo from my childhood. When he snarls his mouth and spits out poems from somewhere deep behind his ribcage, he reminds me of so many boys I once knew. Only, he loves his lady and has a kid and writes poems, so he’s like a guy I once knew and loved and stole beer from 7-11 with, and got angry at the world with, and did graffiti with… but he’s better because he grew up good. He grew up with a way to articulate his anger. That’s exactly his contribution to the literary world. Gets the blood pumping.” —Melissa Chadburn, writer.


“Joe Mattson is a writer. Writing for the most part is a lonely business. For Mattson, writers aren’t his competition, they are his family. Doesn’t matter what level his fellow writer has made it to. Mattson is there with conversation, advice, charm, mischief. Whatever fits the bill.”
—Hank Cherry,filmmaker, photographer, and writer who lives in Los Angeles.



“A rarity he is…To have one of your best friends be your hero in the same stroke, when the second he crashed through my jaded walls, my quality of life immediately skyrocketed. Beyond a kindred spirit…my sense of adventure, creative spirit and bullshit detector was all of a sudden re-baptized in a fire native to Joseph that is contagious just in knowing the man. Reassuring enough to know there is someone here my own age that is a true iconoclast, living, breathing and oozing writing from every cold sweat pore and all the wild inherent humility with his present predicament make his fire glow all the brighter. Never before have I witnessed something so corrupt and unfortunate to somebody more unabashedly righteous in every way you can be, but I am confident justice has the tendency to be a tad tardy…” — Gabriel Hart, frontman of Jail Weddings, guitarist of Dante Vs. Zombies, author of The Intrusion.


“Joseph Mattson’s writing intoxicates with its astonishing sound, its ripe poetry, such beauty compressed into every line. With it he seduces you into a world as strange and rich and full of dangerous wonders as a Dali painting. He’s an essential talent and a generous presence on the LA literary scene.” —Janet Fitch, author of White Oleander, Paint it Black
Jail Weddings
Jail Weddings
Jail Weddings' epic second full length is quite aptly titled. Meltdown: the flailing emotional implosion often borne of a triumvirate of frayed nerves, volatile substances and excessive external pressure is clearly evidenced in the words and music herein. But, there's also a newfound sense of musical genres and histories mixing together like molten wax where the band's signature Shangri-La's, Bad Seeds, noir-hued pop merges with hazy psychedelia, bombastic rock and even essences of bizarre Eastern European folk. It's the sound of a band that's always been at the brink of self-destruction actually growing and thriving on its own chaotic impulses.

It's now six years into something that wasn’t expected to last six months -- this “thing” called Jail Weddings. While the songs have always been timeless and top notch, they're also a band whose initial popularity often hinged on the fact that it could all fall apart at any given moment -- with frequent dagger eyes or fistfights both onstage and off -- where it was always clear to the audience that the high-drama of the songs often spilled into the band members' own precarious lives. They are a group that audiences could live through vicariously, a band capable of not just inspiring listeners' ugly catharsis, but often enacting its own in public. One of few that could claim they are not just a band, but a lifestyle all their own.

It was late 2012 when we had last checked in with frontman Gabriel Hart, who explained that last year’s Four Future Standards EP (described by VICE Magazine as “music to have knife sex to”) was also the gradual bridge to their more grandiose work-in-progress second full-length. Hart ensured that anyone who thought they were any sort of “party band” would be gravely mistaken upon hearing what they had been stirring up in their charred cauldron. Little did he know it would take well over 365 days to finish what he had started, where the stakes were raised, bank accounts drained, sanity/sobriety and sleep compromised, and their longtime rhythm section and one of their back-up singers lost…where towards the end it would cause him and his eight-headed collective to treat it with all the intensity a band would as if it was the last record they would ever record, even though their present locomotive momentum will prove at least that part otherwise.

And what better process to make a record, Meltdown – A Declaration of Unpopular Emotion which Hart describes as a somewhat conceptual “dissection of the personal Apocalypse.” A record whose liner notes cite such patron saints as disparate as philosopher Carl Jung and enfant terrible Francis Farmer as touchstones? But, this is only for the uninitiated to understand – as within the first listen of Meltdown one will soon realize this record is indeed a vast, universal tantrum, where the best path of protest is often to create one's own atmosphere, to secede from pain through a self-imposed baptism of fire. And, the end inspiration proves once again one must look no further than Jail Weddings' own twisted, snake-eating-its-tail world they’ve created.

Meltdown begins somewhat similarly to their 2010 debut Love Is Lawless -- Hart’s lone baritone accompanied by minimal instrumentation slowly building the anticipation that something is about to leave a crater in its wake. But, instead of the Broadway schmaltz approach of their previous effort’s intro, the song explodes as if they are going into battle, marching drums and ominous war siren back-ups announce that they are going into this nervous breakdown unabashed. And before we get a chance to catch our breath, they blow right into the electric 12-string guitar of “May Today Be Merciful” where Hart sets the real tone of the record as if Echo and The Bunnymen were lost in some bad trip section of L.A.’s Paisley Underground scene. Elsewhere, "Why Is it so Hard To Be Good?" lumbers to a start with thunderous early-Swans sounding drums leading a dark lament of our collective penchant to do wrong. Throughout the album there's chiming power-pop ("Dead Celebrity Party"), somber balladry ("Summer Fades", "Obsession"), dramatic pageantry that would make Born To Run era Springsteen blush ("Angel of Sleep") and so many other twists and turns that the album's dramatic title will make perfect sense.

Sessions for Meltdown commenced once again at their home base of The Station House in Echo Park with engineer and co-producer Mark Rains (Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Waylon Jennings, etc). The line-up on Meltdown proves to be their most enduring, sturdiest and studied yet – familiar faces from their last effort being Hart’s right hand man Christopher Rager on guitar (and co-producing), last O.G. member Hannah Blumenfeld on strings (the group has since turned her into an octopus string quartet in the studio – recently earning her full-string duties on the new Ghostface Killer record), secret weapon Marty Sataman on piano/synths, vocalists Jada Wagensomer, Marianne Stewart and Kristina B holding steady as three-part harmony dream team, with Wagensomer occasionally moving front and center as Hart’s female counterpart, where they duet on “Why Is It So Hard To Be Good?” and “…Keeping The Faith,” also seeing her solo spotlight on “A Promise” and “…Never Going To Find Me.” The new fierce rhythm section that came swinging to rescue the group from mid-recording uncertainty includes Morgan Hart Delaney on bass (and blood, as Hart’s own cousin) and Hart’s long co-conspirator Dave Clifford (The VSS, Pleasure Forever, Red Sparowes, Hart’s own Starvations/Fortune’s Flesh) on drums.

Meltdown -- A Declaration of Unpopular Emotion will be available on LP and download via Neurotic Yell Records on August 27th, 2013.
The Starvations
The Starvations
Conceived from a crippled, alcoholic den mother they refer to as "Queen Bee" (immortalized in their song "Queen Bee's Lament"), THE STARVATIONS have staggered through a blurry 10+ year history with their unique brand of moody, abrasive, atmospheric, and always unpredictable roots-punk, something not even remotely seen of this honest a caliber since the days of classic Slash/Ruby Records bands of the early 80's. And while lazy rock journalists will continue to compare the band to the untouchable rep of THE GUN CLUB (a flattering compliment any way you slice it), THE STARVATIONS actually have more in common with their own ill-serving memories, tainted livers, panic attacks, and that special dimly-lit time of dusk where you involuntarily start hallucinating... influencing a sound that's unnerving yet somehow instantly sentimental.THE STARVIES' (as their close friends refer to them) live experience has been described as "stunning with attractive eccentricity", "fast, slow and weird", and "a rock medicine show by gypsies from Mars (?)". From the first chord of "This Is What You Wanted?" to the last disintegrating note of "One Long Night", a certain schadenfreude drives all eyes towards the stage and all ears to the speakers. So what is it about this band that holds our attention for the eternity of a half-hour? Simply that THE STARVATIONS haunted Americana taps the pulsing, diseased vein of Los Angeles herself, a city whose comforts are poisons and whose luxuries are ever-fleeting. They take the resulting despair, escapism, and alienation and dilligently distill it all into a true rock n' roll version/vision of a coyote howling at the moon.
Detective
Detective
DETECTIVE is the new-ish, dream-jangle project of James Greer from Guided By Voices and Guylaine Vivarat of Useless Keys and Tennis System, inspired by the Jean-Luc Godard film of the same name. The band alternates the bubbling melodies of Stereolab, the sparse VU dreamscapes of Galaxie 500 and the hum-along choruses of "Alien Lanes" era GBV! Don't miss this, their PTP debut!
L.A. Drugz
L.A. Drugz
Members of Clorox Girls, Images, Bad Machine
Venue Information:
The Echo
1822 W Sunset Blvd
Los Angeles, California, 90026
http://www.theecho.com