"Alone and Together” Featuring: Kevin Morby, Sam Cohen, Eric D. Johnson (Fruit Bats), Joe Russo and Josh Kaufman at The Sanctuary at Pico-Union Project

Spaceland Presents

"Alone and Together” Featuring: Kevin Morby, Sam Cohen, Eric D. Johnson (Fruit Bats), Joe Russo and Josh Kaufman at The Sanctuary at Pico-Union Project

Sat, March 4, 2017

7:30 pm

The Sanctuary at Pico-Union

Los Angeles, CA

$19.50 - $25.50

This event is 21 and over

Kevin Morby
Kevin Morby
Singing Saw is a record written simply and realized orchestrally. In it, Kevin Morby faces the reality that true beauty - deep and earned - demands a whole-world balance that includes our darker sides. It is a record of duality, one that marks another stage of growth for this young, gifted songwriter with a kind face and a complicated mind.
In the Autumn of 2014, Kevin Morby moved to the small Los Angeles neighborhood of Mount Washington. The move would shape Singing Saw, Morby's first album for new label Dead Oceans. Previous tenants at Morby's new home happened to leave an upright piano behind, with a few mysterious pieces of sheet music and an introductory book of common chords stacked on top. Thankful to finally be in one place for an extended spell, Morby, a beginner at the piano, immediately sat at the new instrument and began composing the songs that would form Singing Saw.
Alongside, he began taking long walks through the winding hills and side streets of the neighborhood each night, glimpsing views of both the skyline's sweeping lights and the dark, dried out underbrush of the LA flora. The duality of the city itself began to shape a set of lyrical ideas that he would refine with the sparse accompaniment of piano and acoustic guitar.
What is a singing saw It is an instrument that creates ethereal sounds, but it is also a tool: basic and practical while also being fearsome, even destructive. Morby watches the singing saw in its eponymous song; that instrument of eerie soft beauty cuts down the flowers in its path and chases after him, while his surroundings mock and dwarf him, Alice in Wonderland style. And in a singing saw, we can understand music as something more powerful than its inviting, delicate sound. No wonder Morby talks about a "songbook" in his head as something he needs to take up the hills so he can "get rid of it." Heavy themes are nothing new for Morby, whose previous records (2013's Harlem River and 2014's Still Life, both released on the Woodsist label) dealt with their own eerie visions and damning prophecies.
Morby opens Singing Saw with "Cut Me Down", a song of tears, debts and a prescient vision of being reduced to nothing. "I Have Been to the Mountain", "Destroyer" and "Black Flowers" continue to explore beauty and freedom, seizing upon the rot that seeps into even the supposedly safest of realms; peace, family and romantic love. By the end of the record on "Water", Morby is literally begging to be put out once and for all, like a fire that might burn all the visions away.
Travels beyond his mountain walks inform songs like "Dorothy", which recounts a trip to Portugal, witnessing a fishing ritual and luxuriating in the aura of a bar light-tinged reunion with old friends The touching innocence of "Ferris Wheel" stands alone in stark simplicity amidst the lush sonic textures of the album. Here, the album is balanced by Morby's signature sweetness and joie de vivre.
The arrangements of Singing Saw trace back to Morby's experience playing in The Complete Last Waltz, a live recreation of The Band's legendary last performance. There, Morby developed a fast friendship with producer/bandleader Sam Cohen (Apollo Sunshine, Yellow Birds), which led Morby to forgo recording in Los Angeles and take the nascent songs of Singing Saw to Isokon Studios in Woodstock, New York. There, in a converted A-frame house, they set about creating a record that would bring a sonic balance, intricacy and depth to match these songs and all that inspired them.
Sam Cohen added a multitude of instrumentation to the record (guitar, bass, drums and keyboard), and were joined by fellow Complete Last Waltz alum Marco Benevento on piano and keyboard, fleshing out Morby's original compositions and upholding the vision for a cohesive piano sound that serves as a touchstone for the entire album. Backup vocalists Hannah Cohen, Lauren Balthrop and Alecia Chakor contribute soaring harmonies; Nick Kinsey (Elvis Perkins) adds drums and percussion; Justin Sullivan, a longtime Morby collaborator and staple of his live band, contributes drums; Oliver Hill and Eliza Bag lift numerous songs with string accompaniments, and Alec Spiegelman on saxophone and flute and Cole Kamen-Green on trumpet bring dramatic swells. Finally, John Andrews (Quilt) adds the eerie lilt of the album's promise, providing saw on the "Cut Me Down" and "Singing Saw".
In the end, Morby fulfills the promise many heard on his first two albums, bringing his most realized effort of songwriting and lyricism to fruition. The songs of Singing Saw reflect the clarity that comes from welcoming change and embracing duality, and the distillation of those elements into an entirely new vision.
Sam Cohen
Sam Cohen is a singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist whose career has taken many forms; formerly a core member of Apollo Sunshine and the man behind Yellowbirds, Cohen has now stepped out on his own with his 2016 solo debut Cool It on 30th Century Records. Cohen is also a producer, having produced recent records by Kevin Morby, Pavo Pavo amongst others and has opened his own studio, Red Delicious, in Brooklyn.
Eric D. Johnson (Fruit Bats)
Eric D. Johnson is best known as the front man and sole permanent member of the long-running American band Fruit Bats, as well as for his frequent work as a film score composer.
"I was so grief-stricken," recalls Johnson. "I wanted to blow up my life."

And so he started over. He abandoned the Fruit Bats band name that carried him for 16 years and five successful studio albums. He ditched the moniker that connected him to stints playing with The Shins and Vetiver and Califone. Instead, Johnson continued pursuing other musical passions. He focused more on scoring films (having already contributed to works like Smashed and Our Idiot Brother). He produced Breathe Owl Breathe's 2013 album Passage of Pegasus and grew his Huichica Music Festival in Sonoma, California.

Then, in 2014, Johnson released a solo album. That record, released under his own name and simply titled EDJ, "was the outpouring of grief" resulting from those experiences.

"The EDJ record was about how making something—like a person—is really easy for some people and really not for some people," he says. "I was so sad about that, but also fearful to discuss it."

In the process of grieving, reflecting, and resigning himself to his new realities, Johnson realized how much weight a name can carry and how much of his sense of self was contained in just two small words.

Eric D. Johnson is Fruit Bats. And Fruit Bats is back.

"I'm finding my identity again," he begins, "which is somehow, weirdly this dumb fake punk rock name that I put on a four-track tape."

Fruit Bats' sixth album Absolute Loser represents a triumphant return to name, form, and self. Despite implications, its title refers to the furthest depths of loss itself, rather than the state of those who have lost something. It's the most honest, most confessional album of Fruit Bats' career.

Johnson draws from deeply those personal experiences, yet Absolute Loser encapsulates universal themes and emotions. While "My Sweet Midwest" could be taken completely literally, it addresses the holistic nature of finding your center during turmoil. "Baby Bluebird" stings in its portrayal of losing what you never really had. Album closer "Don't You Know That" is about picking yourself up, even when no one seems to care how far you fell.

Musically, Absolute Loser retains the same structural pop elements that made Fruit Bats so beloved in the first place. Its simple sounding melodies belie such thick musical textures, as some tracks incorporate up to 10 guitar tracks layered on top of each other. Johnson also hearkens back to his days teaching banjo at Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music, and that instrumentation adds a folksy, Americana spirit to record.

Fruit Bats' rebirth parallels Johnson's resiliency, and Absolute Loser is his treaty on how to redefine oneself after tragedy. Although he maintains that he doesn't have it all figured out quite yet, Johnson acknowledges that with that self-awareness comes some sort of acceptance.

"I am what I am," he says. "And that's freeing in a way."
Joe Russo
Joe Russo is best known as one half of Benevento/Russo Duo and has spent the better part of the last decade setting roots in the Grateful Dead community with his work in Furthur (Weir/Lesh) and now as band leader for Joe Russo's Almost Dead. He has recorded with such artists as Cass McCombs, Bob Weir & Craig Finn.
Josh Kaufman
Josh Kaufman is a multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and producer best known for his work with Bob Weir, The National, Josh Ritter and Craig Finn. He's toured internationally as a sideman and was a member of the late psyche-rock band, Yellowbirds.
Venue Information:
The Sanctuary at Pico-Union
1153 Valencia Street
Los Angeles, CA, 90015
http://www.picounionproject.org/